It’s a tradition now. Every new issue of Derek Van Gieson’s Eel Mansions requires a critics round table dissecting the themes and pop cultural minutiae that snake (eel?) their way through each issue. Keith Silva and Daniel Elkin and company are up to issue 4 now. Here are a few things they say:

Eel Mansions is the closest thing to being inside another person’s head I can get, and I love it. I adore the six-panel pages, thematic establishing shots for what has come, what will come, what you wish might come. The oscillation between South Park-level expressive grotesquerie and faces like those I see every day. I can see why you guys find cannon-balling into the depths so rewarding, and like all good works you get out what you put in, but for me, Eel Mansions is an indie soap opera, too smart for cliffhangers or page-turn reveals, but nevertheless dependent on the well placed non-sequitur.

[…]

If you can’t pick ”the Mick Fleetwood statue” out of a Hellscape Bert and Chee Chee find themselves in than you don’t get it and won’t get it and that’s O.K.

[…]

Think of the Doomin P.S.A in this issue where the figure bemoans how Motown has been ruined for him(?) by corporate consumerism and over-exposure. The Doomin Dancers step in to reveal the beautiful belly underneath the behemoth. The gritty gems of R. Dean Taylor, the bat shit crazy drama of The Hit Pack, Chris Clark’s haunting “I Want To Go Back There Again” — the sound track to Eel Mansions is a love letter to the possibilities the individual creator can bring, even within the concrete dictates of corporate culture. The independent artist will always find a way. Van Gieson has all of his narrative layers infused with this realization, the heartbeat of creation, the procreant urge (again) of love.

Read the whole thing here.

Also, don’t forget that issue 5 was just released!

futureproofdesigns:

Untitled
Benjamin Sack
c. 2013
thepapercity:

beautiful drawings by Giuliano Fiorenzoli - much more here

thepapercity:

beautiful drawings by Giuliano Fiorenzoli - much more here

(via architraffic)

futureproofdesigns:

YMBA Microfactory and the Untapped Capital, part of Reimagining the Bowery
Harry Wei & Han Dong
2013

ryanpanos:

Shadow Patterns | Callum Russell | Socks Studio

Callum Russell is a London-based artist who works on hand-cut paper illustrations. His images are characterized by strong contrasts and large shadows areas which design patterns and textures. The subject are usually street scenes, interior of train stations and bridges with silhouettes of passers-by merging in the building shadows. The refined technique produces images which look somehow out-of-time which may echo far away styles and aesthetics like that of Frank Miller comics or of traditional Japanese woodblock printing.

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Dead end pedestrian overpass. Yorkdale Mall, Toronto.
Source: Toronto Photography Blog (Vik Pahwa) (flickr)

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Dead end pedestrian overpass. Yorkdale Mall, Toronto.

Source: Toronto Photography Blog (Vik Pahwa) (flickr)

(via architectureofdoom)

architectural-review:

Mega stuctures by Atelier Olschinsky

architectural-review:

Mega stuctures by Atelier Olschinsky

architectural-review:

The Seventh Site
Chelsea Kilburn
architectureofdoom:

A concrete relief by Harry op de Laak in the staircase of the Eerste Christelijke LTS (Technical School) Patrimonium, Amsterdam, J.B. Ingwersen, 1952-56. A scan from Een schip aan de Wibautstraat by Jaap-Evert Abrahamse, 1998. View this on the map

architectureofdoom:

A concrete relief by Harry op de Laak in the staircase of the Eerste Christelijke LTS (Technical School) Patrimonium, Amsterdam, J.B. Ingwersen, 1952-56. A scan from Een schip aan de Wibautstraat by Jaap-Evert Abrahamse, 1998. View this on the map

ryanpanos:

Unnatural Perspectives | Morimura Ray | Socks Studio

Born in Tokyo in 1948, painter Morimura Ray graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms, later turning to woodblock printmaking.

According to his profile description in Wikipedia France, his early career as a non-figurative artist has a deep influence on his successive work, since the forms of trees, agricultural fields, houses and other elements are still created through an optimal disposition of triangles, squares and other geometric elements.

His drawings are based on “unnatural”, “flat” perspectives: often depicted from an high vantage point, they never aim to distinguish the figure from the background. Realism is not an issue, textures and hues are given great importance, and every element appears to have the same weight in the composition.

(via thomortiz)